Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 117, 2018-07-02

Fishery policy in the European Union: A multiple criteria approach for assessing sustainable management of Coastal Development Plans in Southern Italy
(Abstract...)

Inventory and conservation assessment for the management of coastal dunes, Veneto coasts, Italy
(Abstract...)

Kisar and the Archaeology of Small Islands in the Wallacean Archipelago
(Abstract...)

A coastal vulnerability assessment for planning climate resilient infrastructure
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Fishery policy in the European Union: A multiple criteria approach for assessing sustainable management of Coastal Development Plans in Southern Italy

Fishery planning and management require environmental, social, and economic assessment that should take into account multiple sustainability criteria as well as the preferences and priorities of decision-makers involved in these complex issues. Therefore, this research aims to identify in a straightforward way the most sustainable coastal development plan (CDP) among a set of several CDPs and to investigate in depth the effective sustainable use of the public fishery's fund among the considered CDPs. This is accomplished by implementing a multiple criteria decision aiding (MCDA) framework that has been tested by six fisheries' local action groups (FLAGs) CDPs in a territorial system strongly affected by fishery activities in the Apulia region of Southern Italy. In particular, the framework was classified into 12 criteria grouped into three sustainability dimensions according to the actions identified by the CDPs; the data collection was carried out by consulting the CDPs. After collecting the data, the MCDA framework was applied by involving the regional consultant on fishery affairs. An analysis of the results clearly showed that the best performances in the distribution of the available funding were related to the coherence of the CDPs with specific environmental, social, and economic features. The proposed MCDA framework can represent support for decision-makers and stakeholders to consider and evaluate in a systematic and robust way different possibilities for funding distribution to detect optimal alternatives within European fishery policies.

Keywords: Fishery; MCDA; Promethee; Coastal Development Plans; Fisheries local action groups.

Source: A. De Boni, R. Roma and G. Ottomano Palmisano (2018); “Fishery policy in the European Union: A multiple criteria approach for assessing sustainable management of Coastal Development Plans in Southern Italy”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 163, 1 September 2018, pp. 11 - 21; Received: 29 September 2017; Revised: 9 February 2018; Accepted: 26 May 2018; Available online: 5 June 2018 under DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2018.05.022

Contact: annalisa.deboni@uniba.it

Link: ScienceDirect

back

Inventory and conservation assessment for the management of coastal dunes, Veneto coasts, Italy

Management of coastal dunes on developed coasts could effectively take advantage of comprehensive and multitemporal georeferenced data collection, which offers the possibility to relate dune data with the natural and cultural characteristics of the beach and hinterland. The recent implementation of a coastal management geodatabase for the Veneto region provides the opportunity for improving knowledge on coastal dunes on developed littoral as well as a basis for appropriate future coastal planning in the study area. The geodatabase gathers data concerning different physical, evolutionary and human aspects of the coastal zone, with a special focus on coastal dunes. Established foredunes, human-altered dunes and relict dunes are irregularly distributed along 59 km, 38% of the entire coastal length. Their distribution and characteristics are the result of favourable natural conditions as well as long-lasting tourism exploitation (evaluated through an index of Land Use Pressure) and fragmentary and diversified uses of beaches (evaluated through an index of Tourism Pressure on the beach). At the same time, beach/dune nourishment intervention allowed the presence of artificial or sand fenced dunes along 17 km of coast. High dune elevation up to 8–10 m is promoted by the onshore exposition of the beach to dominant wind (from ENE), by stable-to-slowly negative sedimentary budget or by the re-activation of high relict foredunes in the case of shoreline retreat associated with strong negative budget. Present sedimentary budget (evaluated through the code ASPE – Accretion, Stable, Precarious, Erosive) is the tool used for dividing coasts in sedimentary compartments or cells. Past and present sedimentary budget and different human responses to erosive cases (hard and soft interventions) give the foredunes different means to form, grow, survive and evolve over time. The assessment of Human Impact and Active Management Practices on the dunes allows a first evaluation of the Management Effectiveness, which shows strong shortcomings for 81% of the dunes. The great variability of beach usage, human impact and management practises on the different dune stretches highlight the lack of effective and systematic management actions being correctly scheduled and performed.

Keywords: Coastal dunes; Geodatabase; Coastal management, Sediment budget.

Source: A. Bezzi, S. Pillon, D. Martinucci et al. (2018); “Inventory and conservation assessment for the management of coastal dunes, Veneto coasts, Italy”, Journal of Coastal Conservation, June 2018, Volume 22, Issue 3, pp. 503 - 518; First online: 12 November 2017 under DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11852-017-0580-y

Contact: bezzi@units.it

Link: Journal of Coastal Conservation

back

Kisar and the Archaeology of Small Islands in the Wallacean Archipelago

The occupation of small islands presents particular challenges for people largely related to limited terrestrial resources and susceptibility to natural disasters. Nevertheless, the challenges and risks inherent in maintaining stable populations on small islands can be offset or overcome through the use of maritime technologies and exchange networks. The archaeology of Here Sorot Entapa rockshelter (HSE) on Kisar Island in the Wallacean Archipelago provides an unparalleled record for examining these issues in Southeast Asia. Kisar is the smallest of the Wallacean islands known to have a Pleistocene occupation record, and one of the smallest permanently inhabited today. Our results indicate that Here Sorot Entapa was first occupied in the terminal Pleistocene by people with advanced maritime technology who made extensive use of local marine resources and engaged in social connections with other islands through an obsidian exchange network. As a result, populations appear to have been maintained on the island for approximately 6,000 years. In the early Holocene occupation at HSE ceased for unknown reasons, and the site was not reoccupied until the mid-Holocene, during which time a major change in the lithic resources can be observed and the exchange network appears to have ceased.

Keywords: Island biogeography; Maritime technology; Fishing; Risk buffering; Obsidian transport.

Source: S. O’Connor, M.S. Keally, C. Boulanger, T. Maloney, S. Hawkins et al. (2018); “Kisar and the Archaeology of Small Islands in the Wallacean Archipelago”, The Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology; Received: 16 November 2017; Accepted: 16 February 2018; Published online: 25 May 2018 under DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/15564894.2018.1443171

Contact: sue.oconnor@anu.edu.au

Link: The Journal of Island and Coastal Archaeology

back

A coastal vulnerability assessment for planning climate resilient infrastructure

There is a good understanding of past and present coastal processes as a result of coastal monitoring programmes within the UK. However, one of the key challenges for coastal managers in the face of climate change is future coastal change and vulnerability of infrastructure and communities to flooding. Drawing on a vulnerability-led and decision-centric framework (VL-DC) a Decision Support Tool (DST) is developed which combines new observations and modelling to explore the future vulnerability to sea-level rise and storms for nuclear energy sites in Britain. The combination of these numerical projections within the DST and a Real Options Analysis (ROA) delivers essential support for: (i) improved response to extreme events and (ii) a strategy that builds climate change resilience.

Keywords: Decision support tool (DST); Real Options Analysis (ROA); Flood hazard modelling; Storm impact monitoring; Human intervention.

Source: J.M. Brown, K. Morrissey, P. Knight et al. (2018); “A coastal vulnerability assessment for planning climate resilient infrastructure”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 163, 1 September 2018, pp. 101 – 112; Received: 26 January 2018; Revised: 1 June 2018; Accepted: 5 June 2018; Available online: 14 June 2018 under DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2018.06.007

Contact: jebro@noc.ac.uk

Link: ScienceDirect

back

NEWSLETTER ARCHIVE

To subscribe to 'Mediterranean Coastal Alert' click HERE.
To unsubscribe from 'Mediterranean Coastal Alert', click HERE.