Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 88, 2016-02-03

Water planning and management in sustainable new town building, the case of Ramshar
(Abstract...)

An analysis of the image of destination Cross River and effect on visitors’ future intentions
(Abstract...)

Designing Coastal Management Strategies for Populations with Distinct Needs: The Case of Learning Disabilities
(Abstract...)

Assessing the observed impact of anthropogenic climate change
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Water planning and management in sustainable new town building, the case of Ramshar

The focus of this paper is on new town building in hydro drought regions. It looks at new town building from the sustainability perspective; especially it discusses the supply and distribution of water in the new towns. The aim of this paper is to resolve a dilemma in the arid regions. One side a much demand for new towns because of the population growth and other side the water anxiety is being a key reason hindering the urban development. Methodological approaches of this paper is to supply some volumes of the required water for a new town in the south of Iran called for Ramshar with the help of intense and devastating, but rare regional rains. The aim is to supply water from the rains and store it in a covered lake near Ramshar. This paper conducts a case study to find the reasons of depletion of the regional water resources, to apply the hydraulic routing method, to make the storage, and to use the water according to a hydrosocial change balance program timely. This paper suggests the practical model to supply water before every new town building. The model is a supportive and feasible tool to overcome the serious dilemma everywhere similar Ramshar.

Keywords: New town; Water resources; Sustainable development; Drought; Flood routing; Hydro social change balance.

Source: A. A. Shahraki (2015); “Water planning and management in sustainable new town building, the case of Ramshar”, International Journal of Water Resources and Environmental Engineering, 7(9), 115-122; Received: 24 December 2014; Accepted: 7 October 2015; Published: 30 November 2015 under DOI: 10.5897/IJWREE2014.0558

Contact: sharaki@kth.se

Link: IJWREE

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An analysis of the image of destination Cross River and effect on visitors’ future intentions

The literature on destination image spanned over four decades. Despite this long period of knowledge accumulation, there is not yet a generally accepted measurement for destination image. This paper seeks to determine the underlying structure of tourism destination image and to investigate the effect of destination image on visitors’ future intentions. An emerging tourism destination in Nigeria (Cross River State) was used as the study area. A systematic sample of 367 onsite visitors was recruited for the study. A well-structured and written questionnaire containing 35 destination image attributes was used to elicit data for the study. Exploratory factor analysis, t test equality test and regression analysis were utilized to identify attributes that underpinned destination image and underlying structure. The exploratory factor analysis produced six dimensions: destination quality of life, natural attractions and facilities, quality of public services, destination product quality and education, industry hospitality and environmental ambience, communication and security. Tourism destination image index of the destination was rated somewhat poor. Inferential statistic shows that there is significant difference in the tourists’ perception of four destination image dimensions (destination quality of life, natural attractions and facilities, quality of public services, destination product quality and education, industry hospitality and environmental ambience and communication and security) based on whether they are domestic or international tourists. Two of the dimensions (quality of public services and communication and security) did not indicate significant difference based on place of residence. The study also shows that there is a significant relationship between tourism destination image dimensions and visitors’ behavioural intentions. Specifically, two destination image dimensions were found to predict visitors’ future intentions (industry hospitality and environmental ambience and natural attractions and facilities). The result of this study is expected to influence the formulation of destination product development and branding strategy which is necessary to create and grow the number of visitor arrivals in the destination.

Keywords: Tourism destination image; Destination attractiveness; Future intentions; Visitor attraction; Social construction; Destination attributes.

Source: B. B. Esu (2015); “An analysis of the image of destination Cross River and effect on visitors’ future intentions”, Journal of Hospitality Management and Tourism, Vol.6(7), pp. 80-89, September 2015; Received: 11 June 2015; Accepted: 29 July 2015; Published: 30 September 2015 under DOI: 10.5897/JHMT2015.0158

Contact: esubenjamin@yahoo.com

Link: JHMT

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Designing Coastal Management Strategies for Populations with Distinct Needs: The Case of Learning Disabilities

The Disability Discrimination Act (1995, amended 2005), Equality Act (2010), EU Disability Action Plan (2003 –2010), and EU Disability Strategy (2010–2020) were designed to make equal opportunities a “reality.” As 16% of the EU population, is statutorily disabled there are considerable implications for beach management. Research examples of beach users include swimmers, anglers, etc. - but rarely people with learning disabilities (LD). This paper considered beach users with LD and their appreciation of three different coastal classifications in South Wales. Because of their disabilities, the research applied a participatory photo interpretation methodology (photovoice). A comparison of the LD ranking of beach issues was made with rankings provided by the general public at the same beaches. Results demonstrated some similarities between LD and general public coastal needs, but identified the need for specific considerations to be made by beach managers for LD users, including informed self-advocacy, use/application of signage, instructive access and a requirement for baseline information gathering. The research proposes an integrated coastal access model from which coastal management/gatekeepers can consider LD needs within coastal strategies. Finally, findings highlight the use of photovoice in coastal research projects and the need for innovative methodological considerations when researching certain groups.

Keywords: : Coastal access; Coastal management; Disability; Photovoice

Source: C. House, J. Samways and A. Williams (2015); “Designing Coastal Management Strategies for Populations with Distinct Needs: The Case of Learning Disabilities”, Journal of Coastal Management, Volume 43, Issue 6, November 2015, pages 589-608; Published Online: 8 December 2015 under DOI:10.1080/08920753.2015.1086948

Contact: chouse@umich.edu

Link: Journal of Coastal Management

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Assessing the observed impact of anthropogenic climate change

mpacts of recent regional changes in climate on natural and human systems are documented across the globe, yet studies explicitly linking these observations to anthropogenic forcing of the climate are scarce. Here we provide a systematic assessment of the role of anthropogenic climate change for the range of impacts of regional climate trends reported in the IPCC’s Fifth Assessment Report. We find that almost two-thirds of the impacts related to atmospheric and ocean temperature can be confidently attributed to anthropogenic forcing. In contrast, evidence connecting changes in precipitation and their respective impacts to human influence is still weak. Moreover, anthropogenic climate change has been a major influence for approximately three-quarters of the impacts observed on continental scales. Hence the effects of anthropogenic emissions can now be discerned not only globally, but also at more regional and local scales for a variety of natural and human systems.

Keywords: Anthropogenic climate change; Systematic assessment.

Source: G. Hansen and D. Stone (2015); “Assessing the observed impact of anthropogenic climate change”, Nature Climate Change Journal (2015), Received: 2 July 2015; Accepted: 16 November 2015; Published Online: 21 December 2015; DOI:10.1038/nclimate2896

Contact: hansen@pik-potsdam.de

Link: Nature Climate Change

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