Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 84, 2015-10-01

Coastal erosion perception and willingness to pay for beach management (Cadiz, Spain)
(Abstract...)

Coastal cultural heritage: A resource to be included in integrated coastal zone management
(Abstract...)

Spectral analysis of waves produced by HSC for coastal management
(Abstract...)

Future Flood Frequency under Sea-Level Rise Scenarios
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Coastal erosion perception and willingness to pay for beach management (Cadiz, Spain)

Coastal zones are complex systems where many different human activities and natural processes converge. One of the most profitable and enjoyable activities is beach tourism and recreation; however, coastal erosion can cause not only loss of land and asset values but also loss of environmental and landscape qualities and therefore their recreational value due to passive erosion from shoreline armouring and coastal development. This paper reports results from economic and demographic factors affecting public coastal erosion awareness and willingness to pay on the urban beaches of Cadiz, SW Spain. Although there is a great public awareness of coastal erosion among the interviewed adults from town, the willingness to pay for beach management improvement is minimal. The fact is possibly explained by the low regional economic status and the large number of local residents among the beachgoers. The majority of the respondents said that there should not be any extra charges because they pay regular local taxes and already pay for using beach services.

Keywords: Community survey; Willingness-to-pay; Logistic regression; Tobit model; Coastal recreation; Beach management.

Source: B. Alves, R.R.-I-Torrent, R. Ballester, J. Benavente and O. Ferreira (2015); “Coastal erosion perception and willingness to pay for beach management (Cadiz, Spain)”, Journal of Coastal Conservation, June 2015, Volume 19, Issue 3, pp 269-280; Received: 22 January 2015; Revised: 7 May 2015; Accepted: 8 May 2015; Published Online: 20 May 2015 under DOI: 10.1007/s11852-015-0388-6

Contact: oc.bruna@gmail.com

Link: Journal of Coastal Conservation

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Coastal cultural heritage: A resource to be included in integrated coastal zone management

Maritime and coastal cultural landscape, encompassing land and sea, and underwater is an important part of our cultural resources in the coastal areas. Although, integrated coastal zone management (ICZM) has theoretically addressed the importance of cultural ecosystems, cultural resources have mostly been overlooked in holistic coastal management plans. Overlooking cultural resources results in loss of cultural identity associated with certain habitats; loss of tourism, recreational and educational opportunities; decline in local ecological knowledge, skills and technology pertaining to habitat management; and loss of opportunities for social and cultural capital. Literature and practice show that there is no proper definition and evaluation of coastal cultural heritage is available and coastal cultural heritage has not been considered as a resource with high level of benefit for development and people. Acknowledging the importance of coastal cultural heritage as a resource in ICZM, and the role that ICZM can play in linking land and sea management approaches highlights the necessity of new methods for defining and evaluation of coastal cultural heritage. This paper proposes models and guidelines for defining and evaluating coastal cultural heritage to be included in Marine Spatial Planning (MSP) and ICZM as a resource through application of the integrative complexity theory and learning from the experiences in management of other coastal resources. The results will be an integrative evaluation method and a guideline for delineating coastal cultural areas. The method and tool will be examined through the case of Ostend in Belgium.

Keywords: Coastal cultural heritage; Integrated coastal zone management; Marine spatial planning.

Source: S. Khakzad, M. Pieters and K. Van Balen (2015); “Coastal cultural heritage: A resource to be included in integrated coastal zone management”, Ocean & Coastal Management, In Press, Corrected Proof; Received: 21 January 2015; Received in Revised Form: 21 July 2015; Accepted: 30 July 2015; Available Online: 21 August 2015 under DOI: doi:10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.07.032

Contact: sorna_serena@yahoo.com

Link: ScienceDirect

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Spectral analysis of waves produced by HSC for coastal management

The present study focuses on wake wash management in the Bay of Naples by time variant spectral analysis to establish more reliable operational strategies and mitigative measures. The time frequency analysis of several wake wash signals due to high-speed craft (HSC), both catamarans and monohulls, operating in the Gulf of Naples is carried out to derive the time-energy per unit area distribution and better characterize the wake wash event and relevant spectrum. A new spectral analysis procedure, which allows to filter the wind sea wave component, is proposed to evaluate the only wake wash component and to estimate both wake wash height and energy density. In this respect, in fact, the influence of wind sea waves may lead to more reliable coastal management guidelines and wake wash measures, even if the measurement campaign has been carried out under calm met-ocean conditions. A comparative study with wake wash values determined by time history analysis is finally carried out, showing that spectral analysis can be applied with good confidence for coastal management purposes, leading to more accurate and reliable operational strategies.

Keywords: Spectral analysis; Wake wash; High-speed craft (HSC); International wake wash rules.

Source: G. Benassai, V. Piscopo and A. Scamardella (2014); “Spectral analysis of waves produced by HSC for coastal management”, Journal of Marine Science and Technology, September 2015, Volume 20, Issue 3, pp 417-428; Received: 12 March 2014; Accepted: 21 September 2014; Published Online: 1 October 2014.

Contact: guido.benassai@uniparthenope.it

Link: Journal of Marine Science and Technology

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Future Flood Frequency under Sea-Level Rise Scenarios

The effect of sea-level rise (SLR) on exceedance probabilities for annual flooding at coastal locations is explored in this paper. We assess four future SLR scenarios given by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and how these SLR scenarios affect monthly flooding statistics. Focusing on one case site, Annapolis, Maryland, we fit the probability density function of the monthly maximum tide gauge record with a Pareto-tail distribution. Random sampling from this distribution is then performed on top of the various future SLR scenarios. Exceedance probabilities for a storm tide to exceed the coastal flood stage, the elevation of which has already been established in a previous paper, are then calculated from the interpolated Pareto cumulative distribution. We illustrate that even mild increases in mean sea level acceleration lead to drastically higher exceedance probabilities of coastal flooding.

Keywords: Sea-level rise acceleration; Storm surge; Statistics.

Source: D. L. Kriebel, J. D. Geiman and G. R. Henderson (2015); “Future Flood Frequency under Sea-Level Rise Scenarios”, Journal of Coastal Research: Volume 31, Issue 5: pp. 1078 – 1083; Received: 15 October 2013; Accepted: 2 August 2014; Received: 1 December 2014; DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00190.1

Contact: kriebel@usna.edu

Link: JCR

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