Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 79, 2015-05-04

Valuating the effects of beach erosion to tourism revenue. A management perspective
(Abstract...)

Easy to use tools for ICZM progress reporting and coastal indicators
(Abstract...)

How to interpret expert judgment assessments of 21st century sea-level rise
(Abstract...)

Disaster sensitive landscape planning for the coastal megacity of Istanbul
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Valuating the effects of beach erosion to tourism revenue. A management perspective

Coastal erosion, besides its various environmental impacts, poses a significant threat to coastal economies where the market for tourism services is a key factor for economic growth. So far, a common practise in evaluating the economic implications of beach erosion is to address the cost of coastal protection measures, abstaining from any revenue losses considerations. The present paper departs from this approach by relating the beach erosion vulnerability with the expected land loss and the relevant value from economic activities. The study employs a combined environmental and economic approach along the geographical space. The value of the eroded beach, capitalized in revenues from tourism business, is estimated through hedonic pricing modelling where the beach value is determined by its width and the tourism business located there. The study aims to provide realistic cost-benefit scenarios for the relevant stakeholders and policymakers so as to prioritize and allocate costs and benefits from a “beach governance” point of view, grounded on the Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) framework. The empirical investigation presented considers the highly touristic coastal city of Rethymnon on the island of Crete as the study area.

Keywords: Coastal erosion; Tourism; Vulnerability;

Source: G. Alexandrakis, C. Manasakis and N. A. Kampanis (2015); “Valuating the effects of beach erosion to tourism revenue. A management perspective”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 111, July 2015, Pages 1–11; Received: 27 June 2014; Received in revised form: 1 April 2015; Accepted: 2 April 2015; DOI:10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2015.04.001

Contact: alexandrakis@iacm.forth.gr

Link: ScienceDirect

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Easy to use tools for ICZM progress reporting and coastal indicators

This paper outlines the experience of the Black Sea countries with the application of European Union (EU) Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) progress markers/indicators and presents the basic instructions used by country representatives to adapt the use of EU ICZM progress indicators to their particular needs, while providing some technical explanations and tips in the application of this toolset. Then, the paper introduces and describes the software instrument developed to simplify data entry and modification processes. In addition to the ICZM progress indicators, the paper applies spectrum-type visualisation to coastal issues in order to derive coastal sustainability indicators for a small pilot area along the Georgian coast. Recommendations on the further application and use of both instruments are made, and certain considerations in building an interface between ICZM progress reporting and aggregated mapping of coastal sustainability indicators are suggested.

Keywords: ICZM progress indicators; Black Sea; EU.

Source: M. Gvilava, T. Bakuradze and A. Gigineishvili (2015); “Easy to use tools for ICZM progress reporting and coastal indicators”, Journal of Coastal Conservation, March 2015; Date: 8 March 2015.

Contact: MGvilava@ICZM.ge

Link: Journal of Coastal Conservation

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How to interpret expert judgment assessments of 21st century sea-level rise

In a recent paper Bamber and Aspinall (Nat Clim Change 3:424–427, 2013) (BA13) investigated the sea-level rise that may result from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets during the 21st century. Using data from an expert judgment elicitation, they obtained a final high-end (P95) value of +84 cm integrated sea-level change from the ice sheets for the 2010–2100 period. However, one key message was left largely undiscussed: The experts had strongly diverging opinions about the ice-sheet contributions to sea-level rise. We argue that such (lack of) consensus should form an essential and integral part of the subsequent analysis of the data. By employing a method that keeps the level of consensus included, and that is also more robust to outliers and less dependent on the choice of the underlying distributions, we obtain on the basis of the same data a considerably lower high-end estimate for the ice-sheet contribution, +53 cm (+38-77 cm interquartile range of “expert consensus”). The method compares favourably with another recent study on expert judgement derived sea-level rise by Horton et al. (Q Sci Rev 84:1–6, 2014). Furthermore, we show that the BA13 results are sensitive to a number of assumptions, such as the shape and minimum of the underlying distribution that were not part of the expert elicitation itself. Our analysis therefore demonstrates that one should be careful in considering high-end sea-level rise estimates as being well-determined and fixed numbers.

Keywords: Sea-level rise; Greenland and Antarctic; Ice sheets; Estimates.

Source: H. de Vries and R. S. W. van de Wal (2015); “How to interpret expert judgment assessments of 21st century sea-level rise”, Climatic Change, May 2015, Volume 130, Issue 2, pp 87-100; Date: 20 February 2015.

Contact: hdv.atmos@gmail.com

Link: Climate Change Journal

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Disaster sensitive landscape planning for the coastal megacity of Istanbul

The 21st century will bring about chaotic environmental issues that are likely to be challenging and which will need innovative solutions. As one of these challenging issues, this study focuses on the at-risk coastal megacity of Istanbul and examines the role of the landscape architecture within the multidisciplinary structure of disaster management. This study includes two of the most at-risk southern coastal districts of Istanbul: Bakirkoy and Kadikoy, and evaluates their open spaces for emergency response by utilizing GIS technology. The evaluation process developed within this study constitutes six phases: examining the landscape and its changes, detecting current urban elements, eliminating unavailable urban elements for emergency response, defining open space and cluster types for the post-earthquake period, assigning clusters and open spaces, and defining strategies. This study highlights the importance of urban open spaces that are planned and designed in a disaster sensitive way for a more effective emergency response. By examining two at-risk coastal districts of Istanbul, this study develops a disaster sensitive planning approach toward the emergency response period, which will enable the generation of long-term disaster sensitive landscape strategies. This study is an attempt to further disaster sensitive landscape studies in the belief that coastal megacity of Istanbul will benefit from them.

Keywords: Istanbul; Landscape architecture; Disaster management; GIS technology.

Source: F. A. Turer Baskaya (2015); “Disaster sensitive landscape planning for the coastal megacity of Istanbul”, Journal of Coastal Conservation, April 2015; Date: 26 April 2015.

Contact: aycimbaskaya@gmail.com

Link: Journal of Coastal Conservation

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