Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 74, 2014-12-02

Development of community based ecotourism in Borena-Saynt National Park, North central Ethiopia: Opportunities and Challenges
(Abstract...)

Coastal climate risk and adaptation studies: The importance of understanding different classes of problem
(Abstract...)

Human-altered coastal systems: processes, monitoring, and management
(Abstract...)

Conflict resolution in coastal resource management: Comparative analysis of case studies from four European countries
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Development of community based ecotourism in Borena-Saynt National Park, North central Ethiopia: Opportunities and Challenges

Promoting ecotourism through the protection of the environment can improve the livelihood of the local community and used as a tool for participatory biodiversity conservation. Ecotourism can help to create jobs for local community and market for local products where by contributing to sustainable conservation of natural resources. The main objective of this study is to assess the opportunities and challenges of Borena-Saynt National Park for the development of community-based ecotourism that enables diversify of the livelihood of the people and sustainable natural resource management. Social survey research methodologies were adopted to assess essential data and analyzed qualitatively. The results showed that a combination of wonderful scenery, diversified wildlife and plant species, amazing caves and culture of the local community makes Borena-Saynt National Park potentially rich for the development of ecotourism. Land degradation, shortage of animal forage and grazing land, low fertility of the soil, scarcity of cultivable land and absences of off-farm activities are among the critical socio-economic problems of the local community that pose pressure on the park. Development of ecotourism program, diversifying the livelihood of the local community, introducing alternative sources of energy, launching afforestation on the buffer zone, animal forage development will help for sustainable natural resource management of the park by improving the well-being of the local community.

Keywords: Ecotourism resources; Land degradation; Community participation; Borena-Saynt National Park.

Source: A. A. Eshetu (2014); “Development of community based ecotourism in Borena-Saynt National Park, North central Ethiopia: Opportunities and Challenges”, Full Length Research Paper, Journal of Hospitality Management and Tourism, Vol. 5(1), pp. 1 – 12, May 2014; Received: 4 November 2013; Accepted: 26 March 2014; Published: 31 May 2014; DOI: 10.5897/JHMT2013.0103

Contact: amuvenu@yahoo.com

Link: JHMT

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Coastal climate risk and adaptation studies: The importance of understanding different classes of problem

Economic intensification continues to increase along many of the world's coastlines. This intensification, which includes asset and infrastructure intensification, along with the increasing likelihood of inundation associated with sea level rise, implies an increasing risk profile for many coastal communities. In response, many cities and owners of major civil infrastructure have commissioned climate risk and adaptation studies in order to develop adaptation strategies. In many cases the same methods, terminology and approaches have been applied in studies of adaptation options for entire communities as for individual structures and assets. It is argued here that as a result of the different scales and complexity between whole communities and individual assets or structures, it is desirable that tailored approaches to identifying adaptation options need to be applied. In particular, it is recommended that categorising settlement and infrastructure studies into either community-scale, or infrastructure-scale problems will help to ensure that the most appropriate methodological approaches are used.

Keywords: Climate change adaptation; Vulnerability; Sea level rise; Coastal adaptation.

Source: M. T. Gibbs (2015); “Coastal climate risk and adaptation studies: The importance of understanding different classes of problem”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 103, January 2015, Pages 9 – 13; Received: 10 June 2014; Received in revised form: 16 October 2014; Accepted: 26 October 2014; Available online under DOI:10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2014.10.018

Contact: Mark.Gibbs@aecom.com

Link: ScienceDirect

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Human-altered coastal systems: processes, monitoring, and management

The imperatives of economic development have constantly brought pressure to bear on coasts. In many countries throughout the world, the coast is increasingly destabilized by the construction of tourist infrastructure, routes, and harbours. The lessons accumulated from the destabilization of coasts by massive development, commonly resulting in erosion and costly mitigation solutions, are commonly forgotten or deliberately ignored under the pressures of development. At the same time, increasing human occupation of the coastal zone is resulting in alterations of the coast and aggravating exposure of coastal communities to risks arising from high-energy events, global change, and sea-level rise.

Keywords: Economic development; Alterations; Coastal zone.

Source: E. J. Anthony and N. P. Psuty (2014); “Human-altered coastal systems: processes, monitoring, and management”, Journal of Coastal Conservation, October 2014, Volume 18, Issue 5, pp 481 – 482; Published online: 26 June 2014.

Contact: anthony@cerege.fr

Link: Journal of Coastal Conservation

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Conflict resolution in coastal resource management: Comparative analysis of case studies from four European countries

Coastal resource management requires the resolution of local resource use conflicts. The research on coastal conflict resolution is still scarce despite the progress made in fisheries and marine related conflict studies. Utilizing qualitative methodology this paper makes comparative analyses of strengths and deficits of coastal conflict resolution practices in three conflicts from the Swedish west coast and five conflicts from the United Kingdom, Italy and Belgium, all studied in the context of the European research project SECOA (Solutions to Environmental Contrasts in Coastal Areas). The analyses focus on power relations among the stakeholders and their practices of knowledge use, including knowledge integration and joint learning. The results show deficits of research and practical neglect of these aspects in coastal management. In the discussion the question of how approaches to conflict resolution can be improved and integrated into long-term strategies of sustainable resource management in coastal areas is addressed. It is concluded that complex conflicts over natural resource use require context specific combinations of formal and informal resolution methods. The interconnected components of transformation of power relations, knowledge integration and joint learning are seen as key components of conflict resolution.

Keywords: Coastal conflicts; Coastal management; Conflict resolution; Knowledge integration; Power relations; Natural resources.

Source: O. Stepanova (2014); “Conflict resolution in coastal resource management: Comparative analysis of case studies from four European countries”, Ocean & Coastal Management, In Press, Corrected Proof; Received: 27 May 2014; Received in revised form: 21 October 2014; Accepted: 26 October 2014; Available online: 7 November 2014; DOI: 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2014.10.017

Contact: olga.stepanova@globalstudies.gu.se

Link: ScienceDirect

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