Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 68, 2014-06-01

No Island is an Island: Participatory Development Planning on the Croatian Islands
(Abstract...)

Climate change and adaptation in the coastal areas of Europe's Northern Periphery Region
(Abstract...)

Assessing Current Conditions of Coastal Dune Systems of Mediterranean Developed Shores
(Abstract...)

Recent trends in international tourist climate preferences: a revised picture for climatic change scenarios
(Abstract...)

Abstract

No Island is an Island: Participatory Development Planning on the Croatian Islands

This text provides an overview of the history of attempts to introduce participatory development planning on the Croatian islands. Within the study of islands, there has been little attention to islands in countries undergoing post-socialist transition. Similarly, within the study of post-socialist strategic development planning, there has been almost no attention to islands. This study addresses both the resilience of islands and their heightened susceptibility to change, borrowing a periodisation from political economies of contemporary Croatia which emphasise the significance of multiple transitions. The text explores island development within socialist Yugoslavia, with islands subsumed within wider processes of industrialisation, urbanisation and, later, coastal tourism. As Croatia’s independence was inextricably linked to war, a crisis-induced authoritarian centralism also mitigated against islanders becoming development subjects. The post-war picture, marked as it is by a slow process of integration into EU norms and practices, shows the gap between the legislative rhetoric and the on the ground practice of participatory development planning. The text concludes that, thus far, only the top down element of strategic planning in terms of island development has been implemented, and this itself in a distorted, contradictory, and highly inconsistent, way.

Keywords: Croatia; Islands; Participation; Planning.

Source: N. Starc and P. Stubbs (2014); “No Island is an Island: Participatory Development Planning on the Croatian Islands”, International Journal of Sustainable Development and Planning, Vol. 9, No. 2 (2014), pp. 158 - 176; Available online at: http://journals.witpress.com; DOI: 10.2495/SDP-V9-N2-158-176

Contact: nstarc@eizg.hr

Link: WIT Press Journals

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Climate change and adaptation in the coastal areas of Europe's Northern Periphery Region

Adaptation to climate change in coastal regions of northern and western Norway, Scotland and Ireland and the coasts of Iceland must respond to trends and variability in a number of physical parameters that affect the regional life and economy. Historical trends and variability are apparent in historical data over several decades in temperature, precipitation and winds. Associated changes in waves, sea level and sea surges are also implied. Predictions of future climate change imply further trends in the same parameters. Those physical parameters act according to the local characteristics of various locations producing predictable impacts (both positive and negative) to which local communities will need to adapt.

Keywords: Climate change; Adaptation; Coastal areas.

Source: J. McClatchey, R. Devoy, D. Woolf, B. Bremner and N. James (2014); “Climate change and adaptation in the coastal areas of Europe's Northern Periphery Region”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 94, June 2014, pp. 9 - 21; Available online: 18 April 2014; http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2014.03.013

Contact: john.mcclatchey@uhi.ac.uk

Link: ScienceDirect

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Assessing Current Conditions of Coastal Dune Systems of Mediterranean Developed Shores

A method of assessment was developed to evaluate the current condition and function of dunes in developed coastal tourist areas of the Mediterranean. The aim was to identify a procedure for differentiating between more and less valuable dune systems. The method was tested on the Costa Brava (Catalonia, NE Spain) and may prove useful for designing conservation and management strategies for coastal dunes in developed areas. The evaluation method was based on a set of 12 indicators relating to three aspects that we consider fundamental for the management of dune landscapes: dune morphology (dune landforms) associated with the evolution of the dune system, dune vegetation, and human impacts. The assessment was tested on each of the 34 existing dune systems of the Costa Brava. Cluster analysis provided a classification into five groups differentiated by characteristics of morphological development, total number of dune-restricted plant species, and degree of human impact suffered. The best evaluation was achieved by the indicators of morphological development, with 76% of the dune systems rating above average. On the other hand, only 42% of the systems rated above average in the indicator of dune-restricted plant species. The worst results came from the indicators of human impact, with only three beaches rating above average in this respect. The evaluation has shown the Costa Brava dune systems to be in a precarious state of conservation because most systems are located on urban or suburban beaches. The best-conserved areas were the larger dune systems located on seminatural or semiurban beaches, where human pressure is weaker. The procedure described in this article provides a useful tool for coastal managers to assess changes in the state of their dune systems over time and to focus their management policies on the protection of systems under the greatest threat.

Keywords: Dune landform; Dune vegetation; Human impact; Mediterranean coast; Costa Brava.

Source: J. Pintó, C. Martí and R.M. Fraguell (2014); “Assessing Current Conditions of Coastal Dune Systems of Mediterranean Developed Shores”, Journal of Coastal Research In-Press; Published Pre-print online: 7 January 2014; Received: 28 May 2013; Accepted in revision: 7 October 2013; Corrected proofs received: 16 December 2013; DOI: 10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00116.1

Contact: josep.pinto@udg.edu

Link: JCR

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Recent trends in international tourist climate preferences: a revised picture for climatic change scenarios

This paper investigates how the role of climate in tourist destination choice has changed over the last 15 years. To this end, a demand model for international tourism is estimated, including the main classic determinants but allowing a time-varying climatic sensitivity of tourists. Moreover, a complete database considering international tourism movement between 178 countries for the period 1995 to 2010 is used. Results show how turning point temperatures in origin and destination countries have changed over the period of analysis, evidencing a loss of competitiveness for traditional warm destinations. Additionally, using data for the projected growth of Gross Domestic Product per capita and climatic conditions within A2, B1 and B2 scenarios, an updated vision of their expected impact on international tourism flows is assessed, evaluating how climate change would imply a greater loss of attractiveness for traditional warm destinations around the world but would increase attractiveness for high latitude countries.

Keywords: Climatic change scenarios; International tourism; Climate preferences.

Source: J. Rosselló and M. Santana-Gallego (2014); “Recent trends in international tourist climate preferences: a revised picture for climatic change scenarios”, Climatic Change, May 2014, Volume 124, Issue 1-2, pp. 119 - 132; Received: 24 June 2913; Accepted: 7 February 2014; Published online: 25 February 2014; DOI 10.1007/s10584-014-1086-3

Contact: JROSELLO@IUB.ES

Link: Climatic Change Journal

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