Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 55, 2013-05-03

Imagine Coastal Sustainability
(Abstract...)

Enhancing the knowledge–governance interface: Coasts, climate and collaboration
(Abstract...)

Eastern Adriatic Coast (EAC): Geomorphology and Coastal Vulnerability of a Karstic Coast
(Abstract...)

Marine ecosystem services in urban areas: Do the strategic documents of Polish coastal municipalities reflect their importance?
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Imagine Coastal Sustainability

Since 2000 Coastal Area Management Programmes (CAMPs) supported by UNEP Mediterranean Action Plan (MAP) and the Priority Actions Programme Regional Activity Centre (PAP/RAC) have been engaging local communities in assessment of their coastal sustainability. The Methods used since 2000 have been based upon an evolving methodology which is now called Imagine. In 2010, the CAMP Levante de Almeria began. “Imagine the future of our coast” is the slogan selected for this project which is intended to turn this area of southern Spain into a sustainability laboratory. The CAMP Levante de Almeria project is a test and a practical demonstration of how to implement Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) concepts in Spain in compliance with the ICZM Protocol (the seventh protocol in the framework of the Barcelona Convention). CAMP acts technically, environmentally and socially as a means to design and implement new practices, relating these to vertical and horizontal co-ordination between local and regional administration and public participation in decision-making processes related to the coastal zone. The fundamental objective of the project is to achieve a wide scale agreement on the sustainable development of the coast. Drawing upon the history of the various CAMP projects, this paper explores progress made so far in the application of the Imagine methodology in CAMP Levante de Almeria and, by contrasting it with summary observations emerging from earlier Imagine applications in Malta, Lebanon, Algeria, Slovenia and Cyprus draws conclusions on the value of engaging coastal communities in sustainability self-assessment.

Keywords: Imagine; Coastal Area Management Programme (CAMP); CAMP Levante de Almeria; Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM); Coastal sustainability.

Source: S. Bell, A. Correa Peña and M. Prem (2013); “Imagine Coastal Sustainability”, Ocean & Coastal Management, In Press, Corrected Proof; Available Online: 26 April 2013.

Contact: s.g.bell@open.ac.uk

Link: ScienceDirect

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Enhancing the knowledge–governance interface: Coasts, climate and collaboration

Conventional systems of government have not been very successful in resolving coastal management problems. This lack of progress is partially attributable to inadequate representation in governance processes of the variety of knowledges present on the coast. In particular there has been a struggle to engage effectively with climate science and its implications. There has also been a broader failure to capture the complexity of voices, interests, values, and discourses of coastal users. We argue here that coastal governance challenges are not likely to be resolved by singular solutions; rather, interaction and collaboration will generate improvements. We suggest that a co-requisite for progress in coastal management is the development of institutions and processes that enable different knowledges to have a bearing on governance processes. This paper examines a selection of the many opportunities available to broaden and enhance the use of knowledge in decision-making for the coast. A description is provided of emerging elements of coastal governance from an Australian perspective, together with new types of institutions, processes, tools and techniques that may help to achieve an improved coastal knowledge–governance interaction.

Keywords: Knowledge; Coastal governance; Interaction; Decision making.

Source: B. Clarke et al. (2013); “Enhancing the knowledge-governance interface: Coasts, climate and collaboration”, Ocean & Coastal Management, In Press, Corrected Proof; Available Online: 26 February 2013.

Contact: beverley.clarke@flinders.edu.au

Link: ScienceDirect

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Eastern Adriatic Coast (EAC): Geomorphology and Coastal Vulnerability of a Karstic Coast

Coastal zones are one of the most rapidly changing environments on the global scale, mainly caused by anthropogenic activities (industry, urbanization, tourism, and food production). Coastal erosion is primarily a natural process, although human-induced coastal changes are becoming more and more present and are significant factors associated with the loss of beach capacity. The eastern Adriatic coast (EAC) is one of the most rapidly growing tourist markets within the Mediterranean, along which beaches still represent a leading component of the tourism resource. The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of natural geomorphologic features of the EAC as a starting point for further investigation and sustainable management of the coastal zone. The EAC is generally steep and rocky, mostly built up of karstified carbonates, and characterized, thus, by a variety of drowned karstic forms. Beaches in carbonates are mostly small, narrow, and scattered pocket gravel beaches. Coasts developed in the flysch and associated rocks are characterized by longer sandy and gravel beaches. The total beach length along the EAC presumably does not exceed 5%, and the small proportion of the beach length in relation to the rest of the EAC emphasizes their value in the tourist valorization, indicating the need for protection and sustainable management. Due to their geomorphologic diversities, fragmentation, different orientation, length, and sediment composition and budget, each beach should be studied separately and on a small scale. Detailed information on beach profiles, the nearshore geomorphology, and the beach processes needed to plan a sustainable coastal development is still mostly missing.

Keywords: Eastern Adriatic Coast (EAC); Geomorphology; Coastal vulnerability; Submerged karst; Beaches.

Source: K. Pikelj and M. Juračić (2013); “Eastern Adriatic Coast (EAC): Geomorphology and Coastal Vulnerability of a Karstic Coast”, Journal of Coastal Research, In Press; Received: 18 July 2012; Accepted: 16 October 2012; Published Pre-Print Online: 27 February 2013.

Contact: kpikelj@geol.pmf.hr

Link: JCR online

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Marine ecosystem services in urban areas: Do the strategic documents of Polish coastal municipalities reflect their importance?

Marine ecosystem services (MES) condition the development of coastal urban areas, but their benefits are often taken for granted. The purpose of this study is to test how MES are perceived in the practice of urban planning and long-term management. We searched for MES recognition in 63 strategic documents of the 10 largest Polish seaside towns and cities. The criteria we used in analyzing the documents included (i) the character of references to local seaside conditions, (ii) the priority of local development objectives related to the sea, (iii) references to marine ecosystem services and disservices, (iv) references to trade-offs between ecosystem services, and (v) postulates for environmental protection. Our analysis reveals that MES are acknowledged, but their recognition is partial and limited to the services which are already captured by market mechanisms. Limited identification of MES leads to insufficient discussion of current and future trade-offs, even though the “environment or development” dilemma is commonly emphasized. Low levels of inclusion of MES in the strategic documents of Polish municipalities may be caused by (i) low environmental awareness, (ii) underdeveloped institutions, and (iii) poor implementation of sustainable development principles.

Keywords: Marine ecosystem services; Coastal municipalities; Poland; Urban planning and management.

Source: J. Piwowarczyka, J. Kronenbergb and M. A. Dereniowskac (2013); “Marine ecosystem services in urban areas: Do the strategic documents of Polish coastal municipalities reflect their importance?”, Landscape and Urban Planning, Volume 109, Issue 1: pp. 85 – 93, January 2013, Special Issue: Urban Ecosystem Services; Available Online: 9 November 2012.

Contact: piwowarczyk@iopan.gda.pl

Link: ScienceDirect

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