Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 15, 2010-11-16

An evaluation of the Implementation of the European ICZM Principles
(Abstract...)

Preserving the maritime cultural heritage of the Mediterranean, a cradle of cultures, religions and civilisations - the Holy Land perspective
(Abstract...)

Advances in Integrated Coastal Management for the Mediterranean & Black Sea
(Abstract...)

Coastal risk management: how to motivate individual economic decisions to lower flood risk?
(Abstract...)

Abstract

An evaluation of the Implementation of the European ICZM Principles

The European principles of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) are often viewed as central, defining features of the EC approach to ICZM, enshrined within the EC Recommendation (2002/413/EC) and endorsed by the European Commission in its Communication on ICZM (COM(2007) 308 final). This paper presents the findings of COREPOINT surveys which evaluated the extent to which the ICZM principles are addressed and interpreted across the North West European region. An interpretation of these findings is undertaken in order to provide an assessment of local ICZM development against the European ICZM Progress Indicator. The surveys revealed rather mixed adherence to the EC ICZM principles at national, regional and local levels, although there were some promising results related to the principles of local specificity and stakeholder engagement. The principles providing the greatest challenge were those promoting the broad holistic approach, the long-term approach and adaptive management. The surveys demonstrated the value of using a structured, clearly designed “expert” survey for providing an insight into operational aspects of the ICZM principles and provided a means of assessing the ICZM progress. As such, this paper provides a useful contribution to the ongoing European and wider debate about the principles and their evaluation.

Keywords: Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM); Coastal zone principles; COREPOINT; Progress Indicator; North West Europe.

Source: R. Ballinger, A. Pickaver, G. Lymbery and M. Ferreira (2010); “An evaluation of the Implementation of the European ICZM Principles”, Ocean & Coastal Management; Article in Press, Accepted Manuscript; Available Online: 22 October 2010, under DOI: 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2010.10.013.

Contact: A.Pickaver@eucc.net

Link: ScienceDirect

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Preserving the maritime cultural heritage of the Mediterranean, a cradle of cultures, religions and civilisations - the Holy Land perspective

The article presents the main ancient marine sites of the Holy Land, points the endangered sites and the needed preservation activities. The ancient cultural heritage existing on the Mediterranean shores reflects important events in the history of humanity. It represents numerous important cultures, religions and traditions. This coastal and underwater heritage is rapidly eroded due to sea level rise, global changes and rapid coastal development. Actions taken by the State of Israel to rescue, protect and preserve the marine cultural heritage include: underwater rescue surveys; coastal erosion monitoring; risk assessment surveys and pilot projects for protecting and preserving the sea front of the antique sites at Akko, Apollonia and Ashkelon. Israel proposes that the Mediterranean and European countries establish a collaborative project aimed at mapping the cultural recourses and establishing master plans for the protection and preservation of the marine and coastal cultural heritage of the Mediterranean.

Keywords: Coastal archaeology; Marine archaeology; Underwater shipwrecks; ICZM; Israel.

Source: E. Galili and B. Rosen (2010); “Preserving the maritime cultural heritage of the Mediterranean, a cradle of cultures, religions and civilisations - the Holy Land perspective”, Journal of Coastal Conservation, Volume 14, Number 4; Received: 30 April 2009; Revised: 10 June 2010;  Accepted: 14 June 2010;  Published Online: 17 July 2010 under DOI: 10.1007/s11852-010-0107-2.

Contact: udi@israntique.org.il

Link: SpringerLink

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Advances in Integrated Coastal Management for the Mediterranean & Black Sea

The present Special Issue on “Advances in Integrated Coastal Management (ICM) for the Mediterranean and Black Sea” originates from the 2nd International Conference / Workshop on the State-of-the-Art of ICM in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea: Immediate Needs for Research, Education/Training and Implementation (MED & Black Sea ICM 08), which was held on 14 - 18 October 2008, in Akyaka (Turkey). Since the first conference, as noted in Akyaka, significant progress has been made in the management of coastal areas of either basin, at both national and regional levels, as the result of work supported and carried out by national, regional and international organisations, as well as of the efforts of the NGO community. In particular, the Protocol on Integrated Coastal Zone Management in the Mediterranean, signed by the majority of the Mediterranean countries in January 2008, which is the first regional legal instrument on this subject, is an indication of the level of present undertakings for ICM. After 12 years, it was considered timely to review once again the state-of-the-art of ICM in the Mediterranean and the Black Sea countries, utilising the same format and making reference to the results achieved in 1996. Similar to the original event, the aim of the second conference was to provide a platform for the Mediterranean and Black Sea countries to share their problems and successful experiences in ICM and to contribute to bi-lateral and regional collaboration, for improved joint efforts to enhance ICM in both basins. A volume of proceedings was released after the Conference, collecting all of the manuscripts submitted in relation to the topics above, and a final statement was issued. However, during the Conference, an idea was also born to collect and publish a set of peer-reviewed papers, to appear in a major international journal of the ICM sector, in order to enhance the impact of the foremost contributions presented at the Akyaka event. Of course, this paper collection cannot provide an exhaustive coverage of the entire spectrum of items worthy of an in-depth analysis, in the present panorama of ICM topical issues in the Mediterranean and Black Sea. However, it should be enough to provide the reader with an adequate idea of what has been achieved since the first MEDCOAST Conference in 1996, and of the work still ahead of us, as highlighted by the second Conference in 2008.

Keywords: Integrated Coastal Management (ICM); The Mediterranean & Black Sea; Akyaka (Turkey); MEDCOAST conference; Problems; Successful experiences.

Source: V. Barale and E. Özhan (2010); “Advances in Integrated Coastal Management for the Mediterranean & Black Sea”, Journal of Coastal Conservation, Volume 14, Number 4, Pages: 249-255; From the issue entitled "Special Issue: Advances in Integrated Coastal Management for the Mediterranean & Black Sea / Guest Edited by Vittorio Barale and Erdal Özhan"; Published Online: 14 August 2010, under DOI: 10.1007/s11852-010-0116-1.

Contact: vittorio.barale@jrc.ec.europa.eu

Link: SpringerLink

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Coastal risk management: how to motivate individual economic decisions to lower flood risk?

Coastal flood risk is defined as a product of probability of event and its effect, measured in terms of damage. The paper is focused on coastal management strategies recommending how to decrease risk by decreasing potential damage. We have reviewed a socio-economic literature to show that the total flood damage depends on individual location choices in the housing market and on individual flood risk awareness. Low flood risk awareness leads to inefficient spatial developments and increased flood risk. Personal experience, risk communication, financial instruments, like insurance from flooding, and technical instruments, like building on high elevations, are factors that increase individual risk awareness. Evidence is provided that these factors indeed affect housing prices and land-use patterns. Proactive instruments that can be used in coastal zone management in the Netherlands to increase individual risk awareness are discussed. We argue that policy-makers may create incentives giving individuals a possibility to make location choices that lead to less total flood risk in the coastal zone area.

Keywords: Coastal risk management; Coastal flood risk; Awareness; The Netherlands.

Source: T. Filatova, J.P.M. Mulder and A. van der Veen (2010); “Coastal risk management: how to motivate individual economic decisions to lower flood risk?”, Ocean & Coastal Management; Article in Press, Accepted Manuscript; Received: 14 February 2009;  Revised: 4 August 2010;  Accepted: 29 October 2010; Available Online: 5 November 2010.

Contact: T.Filatova@ctw.utwente.nl

Link: ScienceDirect

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