Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 14, 2010-11-01

Coastal Issues and Conflicts in North West Europe: A Comparative Analysis
(Abstract...)

Practitioner Training for Building Capacity in ICZM
(Abstract...)

The role of Public Participatory Geographical Information Systems (PPGIS) in Coastal Decision-making Processes: An Example from Scotland, UK
(Abstract...)

Adaptation Behaviour in the Face of Global Climate Change: Survey Responses from Experts and Decision Makers Serving the Florida Keys
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Coastal Issues and Conflicts in North West Europe: A Comparative Analysis

This paper identifies and examines current coastal issues and conflicts in the northwest Europe region through the use of questionnaire surveys. The overall management concerns and outstanding problems across the region are highlighted and the results are presented in relation to previously identified management issues in northeast England, east Grampian in Scotland, and France. The survey presents a list of identified issues, each of which has a direct relationship to one of the three pillars of sustainable development (environment, economic and social), and therefore the Lisbon Agenda (economic and social) and the Gothenburg Agenda (environment and environmental risk). The survey reveals that the important coastal management issues across the region are the large-scale concerns traditionally associated with ICZM: land-use planning, estuary management, natural resource and landscape protection, and water quality. Generally, respondents considered that management response to these issues is poor. Dissatisfaction levels were particularly high in France and Ireland, and to a lesser extent, in England. Water quality management escapes general criticism. This can be regarded as a positive finding, because it indicates that pan-European initiatives (the water-related EU directives) can deal effectively with this pan-European problem. The paper considers the links between the main issues across North West Europe and aims to distinguish how current coastal management practices have affected the range of issues arising.

Keywords: Coastal Management; North West Europe; Sustainable Development; Coastal conflicts; Lisbon Agenda; Gothenburg Agenda.

Source: M.C. O'Connor, J. McKenna and J.A.G. Cooper (2010); “Coastal Issues and Conflicts in North West Europe: A Comparative Analysis“, Ocean & Coastal Management; Article in Press, Accepted Manuscript; Available Online: 22 October 2010, under DOI:10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2010.10.013.

Contact: m.oconnor@ulster.ac.uk

Link: ScienceDirect

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Practitioner Training for Building Capacity in ICZM

Capacity building has been a much promoted principle of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) since its advent beginning in the 1970s. Although the concept of capacity building includes human resource development, organisational development and institutional and legal framework development, in practice it has often become focussed on the transfer of technical knowledge and procedures to managers and decision makers. The effect of this is often to emphasise and promote sectoral approaches rather than a holistic one as advocated by ICZM. Experiences gained during the EU Interreg IIIB COREPOINT project led to the development of a training programme that progressively reduced its formal lecture-style content and increased opportunity for discussion and delegate participation. It also produced a more uniform and systematic style and structure to presentations, in particular the case studies illustrating the eight EU ICZM principles of best practice, and embedded the ICZM principles and European perspectives of coastal management within the context of the work environment. This paper reviews methods for practitioner-oriented capacity building, and details the evolution of a training course to sensitise and familiarise coastal practitioners with the principles and practices of ICZM, working from local to national to trans-national scales. The lessons learnt from the ICZM capacity development in COREPOINT are identified and it is suggested that these are relevant and applicable to many other ICZM initiatives.

Keywords: Integrated Coastal Zone Management; Capacity building; COREPOINT; Coastal management training.

Source: M.A'A.A. Le Tissier and J.M. Hills (2010); “Practitioner training for building capacity in ICZM”, Ocean & Coastal Management; Article in Press, Accepted Manuscript; Available Online: 22 October 2010, under DOI 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2010.10.014.

Contact: M.Le-Tissier@Envision.uk.com

Link: ScienceDirect

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The role of Public Participatory Geographical Information Systems (PPGIS) in Coastal Decision-making Processes: An Example from Scotland, UK

This paper explores a technical solution (GIS-application) as a possible alternative for public participation in coastal decision making. Through examination of a Scottish local case study, the paper examines the evidence that Geographical Information Systems (GIS), and more specifically Public Participatory GIS (PPGIS), can lead to or influence greater legitimacy in decision making in public participation in coastal management and waterfront development. Whilst demonstrating that GIS and PPGIS have considerable potential to provide the public with access to accurate data and factual information, to be able to integrate multiple and disparate data sources to allow merging of data, and to use various visualisation techniques, the complexities associated with PPGIS suggest that further research is required to establish if and how participatory GIS can increase legitimacy in a decision-making process.

Keywords: Public participation; ICZM; Coastal decision making; Stakeholder approach; GIS; Waterfront development.

Source: D. R. Green (2010); “The role of Public Participatory Geographical Information Systems (PPGIS) in coastal decision-making processes: An example from Scotland, UK”, Ocean & Coastal Management; Article in Press, Accepted Manuscript; Available Online: 22 October 2010, under DOI 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2010.10.008.

Contact: d.r.green@abdn.ac.uk

Link: ScienceDirect

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Adaptation Behaviour in the Face of Global Climate Change: Survey Responses from Experts and Decision Makers Serving the Florida Keys

We conduct a survey to elicit responses from experts and decision makers serving the Florida Keys regarding vulnerability to global climate change. Study findings reveal deep concern among federal, state and local experts and decision makers about adverse impacts at the local level. A large majority of respondents recognise the increasing likelihood of dynamic, potentially irreversible, socio-economic and ecological repercussions for the Florida Keys. However, very few experts and decision makers report that their respective agencies have developed formal adaptation plans. Respondents identify significant institutional and social barriers to adaptation and convey their support for a host of strategic measures to facilitate adaptation on an urgent basis. The implications of our findings are discussed in the context of enhancing adaptive capacity and resilience in the Florida Keys and beyond. Information generated from this study can provide functional guidance for improving decision-support systems and promoting adaptation policies.

Keywords: Adaptation; Florida Keys; Climate change; Sea level rise; Coral reefs.

Source: P. Mozumder, E. Flugman and T. Randhir (2010); “Adaptation Behaviour in the Face of Global Climate Change: Survey Responses from Experts and Decision Makers Serving the Florida Keys”, Ocean & Coastal Management; Article in Press, Accepted Manuscript; Received: 10 May 2010;  Revised: 4 October 2010;  Accepted: 5 October 2010; Available Online: 16 October 2010, under DOI 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2010.10.009.

Contact: mozumder@fiu.edu

Link: ScienceDirect

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