Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 4, 2010-05-31

The Strategy for Coastal Sustainability: A Spanish Initiative for ICZM
(Abstract...)

The Potential Contribution of the 2010 Soccer World Cup to Climate Change: An Exploratory Study among Tourism Industry Stakeholders in the Tshwane Metropole of South Africa
(Abstract...)

Education and training for integrated coastal zone management in Europe
(Abstract...)

Comparing resident and tourist preferences for public beach access and related amenities
(Abstract...)

Abstract

The Strategy for Coastal Sustainability: A Spanish Initiative for ICZM

The Spanish Strategy for Coastal Sustainability (SCS) was an initiative aimed at implementing coastal interventions under the principles of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM) and improving the state of the coast at the Spanish national level. The SCS, promoted by the Spanish Ministry of the Environment, started as a broad national strategy in 2005 and was finally delivered as a coastal planning instrument at the regional level in late 2007, designed to address coastal policies within the Spanish maritime–terrestrial public domain (MTPD). The initiative was triggered by the increasing pressure on the coastal zone and its preparation was supported by different European initiatives, first of all the European Recommendation on ICZM (413/2002/EC), while taking into consideration the future requirements of the Mediterranean Protocol on ICZM of the Barcelona Convention, signed in February 2008. Technically, the preparation of the SCS included four steps: (i) a Stakeholder Identification and Engagement process, including a stocktaking of the laws and regulations, (ii) the design of a broad Strategic Framework for the Spanish coastal zone, including a set of specific objectives and the instruments for its implementation, (iii) the signature of co-operation agreements for ICZM between the central government and the regions, and (iv) a detailed Technical Diagnosis at the local scale, designed to address future coastal interventions in the maritime–terrestrial public domain and its areas of influence. This article aims to: (i) illustrate the triggering factors of the SCS, including the Spanish coastal issues, the administrative framework at the national level, and the European and international policies addressing coastal management, and (ii) illustrate the approaches and methodologies used for the preparation of the SCS, reporting the most relevant quantitative results. The article concludes that the SCS gave a strong contribution in the construction of a base of knowledge for the coastal zone and to improve coastal management practices. Despite this, complex distributions of competences still undermine the implementation of strategic interventions. In this context, the future ratification of the ICZM Protocol of the Barcelona Convention represents an opportunity to use the SCS process results and improve coastal management practices and the state of the coast.

Keywords: Coastal issues; EC ICZM Recommendation; ICZM; ICZM Agreements; Mediterranean ICZM Protocol; ICZM Strategic Framework; Spain; Spanish Strategy for Coastal Sustainability; Stakeholders Identification and Engagement; Technical Diagnosis

Source: Sanò, M., Gonzalez-Riancho, P., Areizaga, J. and Medina, R. (2010), “The Strategy for Coastal Sustainability: A Spanish Initiative for ICZM“, Coastal Management, 38: 1, 76 — 96, First published on: 15 December 2009 (iFirst).

Contact: sanom@unican.es

Link: InformaWorld

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The Potential Contribution of the 2010 Soccer World Cup to Climate Change: An Exploratory Study among Tourism Industry Stakeholders in the Tshwane Metropole of South Africa

With increasing concern regarding global climate change, there is a growing need to ensure responsible management practices for mega events that take cognisance of the realities and challenges regarding this phenomenon. The existence of a relationship between the tourism industry and climate change has only recently been addressed by researchers. This study explores the potential impacts of mega events on climate change, with particular reference to the 2010 Soccer World Cup. The methodology used for this study was in-depth personal interviews conducted amongst key stakeholders in the Tshwane Metropole, South Africa. A combined use of purposive and snowball sampling was used to identify the target population. A key finding of the study was that the various stakeholders are not aware of the contributions their operations make to climate change. However, when these contributions are linked to an event such as the 2010 Soccer World Cup, greater consideration is given to this phenomenon in their business operations. This study indicates that it is of crucial importance to consider and responsibly manage the impacts that mega events can have on climate change. Based on this study it is suggested that appropriate environmental management strategies and guidelines are developed, not only for individual stakeholders, but also for all industries in South Africa in order to ensure that operations are conducted in a sustainable manner.

Keywords: Global Warming; Climate Change; The 2010 Soccer World Cup; Tshwane Metropole.

Source: Otto, I. and Heath, E.T. (2009), “The Potential Contribution of the 2010 Soccer World Cup to Climate Change: An Exploratory Study among Tourism Industry Stakeholders in the Tshwane Metropole of South Africa”, Journal of Sport & Tourism, Volume 14, Issues 2-3, Pages 169 – 191.

Contact:

Link: InformaWorld

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Education and training for integrated coastal zone management in Europe

This paper provides an overview of the current situation of education and training for ICZM in Europe. This overview results from the analysis of the general characteristics, contents and orientation of a significant number of courses from a representative set of countries and international organizations in Europe. This type of comparatively systematic information provides a framework within which education and training efforts can be meaningfully evaluated from a regional perspective. Based on the survey conclusions, the paper reflects on the level of interconnection between the way in which ICZM is currently taught in Europe and the capacity needs arising from the scenario in which it takes place. In view of such scenario, and in order to advance ICZM practice in Europe, some broad recommendations to enhance education and training efforts are finally provided.

Keywords: Education; Training; Integrated Coastal Zone Management; Europe; Comparatively systemic information; Regional perspective; Survey; Recommendations.

Source: Garriga, M. and Losada, I.J. (2010), “Education and training for integrated coastal zone management in Europe”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 53, Issue 3, March 2010, Pages 89-98.

Contact: mailto:inigo.losada@unican.es

Link: ScienceDirect

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Comparing resident and tourist preferences for public beach access and related amenities

As coastal destinations continue to grow, due to tourism and residential expansion, the demand for public beach access and related amenities will also increase. The issue confronting management agencies responsible for providing and maintaining public beach access and related amenities is the varying needs and preferences of both residents and tourists of coastal destinations. The purpose of this paper is to provide comprehensive information about coastal recreational needs of residents and tourists with regards to public beach access and associated amenities using the stated preference choice method. Overall, the results indicate tourists were more interested in additional public beach access points and commercial development, while residents supported beach rules and regulations but opposed high levels of crowding and noise. Implications of these results for management agencies include the utilization of parking fees to subsidize additional public beach access points, identifying appropriate types and levels of commercial development that moderate the use of coastal resources by tourists and day-trip users, and implementing beach rules and regulations that reduce the potential for conflict between user groups. Providing management agencies with comprehensive information of the preferences of different beach user groups can assist in the development of more effective policies and management programs.

Keywords: Public beach access; Tourism; Residential expansion; Coastal recreational needs; Coastal destinations; Associated amenities; Commercial development; Crowding; Noise; Parking fees; Comprehensive information; Policies and management programs.

Source: Chi-Ok, O., Draper, J. and Dixon, A.W. (2010), “Comparing resident and tourist preferences for public beach access and related amenities“, Ocean & Coastal management, Volume 53, Issue 5-6, May-June 2010, Pages 245-251, Available online 13 April 2010.

Contact: ohc@msu.edu

Link: ScienceDirect

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